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Sex Offender Registry Frequently Asked Questions

1. Will this website provide all of the known sex offenders in our state?

2. Can I obtain information by phone?

3. Is the information on this website timely and accurate?

4. Is it a crime if a convicted sex offender fails to register?

5. If I have a specific question or concern about a person that is believed to be a sex offender threat, what can I do?

6. Can the average citizen have any impact on the laws that affect the sex offender population?

7. How does Nevada rank in comparison with other state Sex Offender Registry programs?

8. Is there any legislative oversight on the Sex Offender Registry Program?

9. When requesting a Reconsideration Hearing on my Tier Level Assessment for Community Notification, how do I obtain copies of case file information that is not generated by the State Sex Offender Registry?

 

1. Will this web page provide all of the known sex offenders in our state?

Contrary to popular belief the state website does not provide information on all registered sex offenders. The rules as to who can be posted on the community notification website are established by state law (NRS 179B.250). Effective July 1, 2006, all Tier Level 2 and Tier Level 3 offender information will be available to the public. This information will include the complete address of any residence at which the offender resides, conviction information, the Tier Level of notification assigned to the offender, and a photographic image of the offender.  

2. Can I obtain information by phone?

Yes, you may call the State Sex Offender Registry at (775)684-6262 and speak with an investigator assigned to the Registry.

Information that an investigator can release to the public is restricted by NRS 179B.250 and is the same information which is available on the Community Notification website.

3. Is the information on this website timely and accurate?

The short answer is “yes”. This information is both timely and accurate because this website is connected to a server that gets continual updates. This does not mean that the data files will be error free. If you are aware of any error on this shared information, you can contact your local law enforcement agency.

4. Is it a crime if a convicted sex offender fails to register?

Yes, in every state there is some measure of sex offender registration required. In the case of Nevada, we have three statutes that apply to registration requirements. Our state takes this matter seriously and consequently it is considered a felony offense, if any of the three statutes are violated. The first applicable statutes are NRS 179D.240 and NRS 179D.460, which imposes a 48-hour requirement on any sex offender leaving actual custody from a jail or prison. These statutes also apply to a visitor or worker that comes into our state. In short, it means that the sex offender has 48 hours to report to a local law enforcement agency to complete the necessary paperwork. The second applicable statutes are NRS 179D.250 and NRS 179D.470, which imposes a general responsibility to share a change of address with the State Sex Offender Registry Unit anytime a sex offender has a change in address. The third applicable statutes are NRS 179D.260 and NRS 179D.480, which imposes an annual requirement for the sex offender to respond to the notice mailed out by the State Sex Offender Registry Unit. Sex offenders, when leaving prison, are made aware of these requirements and sign a form acknowledging they have been briefed on Nevada State law governing registration requirements.

5. If I have a specific question or concern about a person that is believed to be a sex offender threat, what can I do?

Your local law enforcement agency is your best contact for reporting suspicious activity. Most agencies have a designated Sex Offender Unit that will address your questions and concerns.

6. Can the average citizen have any impact on the laws that affect the sex offender population?

Yes, this is clearly a democratic process. The legislators who make the laws that govern this type of program are ready to hear your concerns. Based upon this public input, they are willing to change public policy to promote the welfare of their constituents. During each legislative session there are hearings on proposed (SOR) law changes. These hearings are held in open sessions where any voice can be heard. If you feel that the laws are too lax, you can make that point. On the other hand, if you feel that these laws have gone too far, you have the same opportunity to make your concerns known. In addition, there are certain advocacy groups in our State that make their collective opinions known to the legislators.

7. How does Nevada rank in comparison with other state Sex Offender Registry (SOR) Programs?

In 2002, Nevada received a poor mark when compared to other state Registries. Since that time Nevada law makers have proven to have a keen interest in registration requirements and the public's need to be aware of offenders residing in the community. This Community Notification website is made available to increase the public's awareness of offenders residing in the community. Recent changes in the law now allow for the posting of the address of any residence at which an offender resides if determined to be a Tier Level 2 or Tier Level 3 level of notification. Additionally, Nevada has linked it's Sex Offender Registry with the FBI's National Sexual Offender Registry. The role of the State SOR work section is to share information so law enforcement can be even more effective.

8. Is there any legislative oversight on the Sex Offender Registry Program?

During the legislative sessions, both the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Assembly Judiciary Committee have direct interest and involvement in this subject. They are the committees that consider any changes. During the legislative off-season, there is a committee called Advisory Council for Community Notification of Sex Offenders. In addition to legislators on this committee, there are two prosecutor representatives and one representative from the Board of Parole Commissioners. The Council meets periodically, as needed.

9. When requesting a Reconsideration Hearing on my Tier Level Assessment for Community Notification, how do I obtain copies of case file information that is not generated by the State Sex Offender Registry?

In order to obtain case file documentation you will need to contact the entering agency directly:

Judgment of Conviction - Contact the Court in which you were convicted

Police Report - Contact the Arresting Agency

Pre Sentence Report (For Nevada Cases Only) - Contact the Division of Parole and Probation

Nevada Criminal History Record - Submit Fingerprints and a Cashiers Check or Money Order for $21.00 to:

    Nevada Criminal History Repository
    333 West Nye Lane, Suite 100
    Carson City, NV 89706

FBI Criminal History Record - Submit Fingerprints and a Cashiers Check or Money Order for $18.00 to:

    Assistant Director
    Criminal Justice Information Services
    Federal Bureau of Investigation
    PO Box 4142
    Clarksburg, WV 26302-9922

In order to obtain copies of all other documentation, you must contact the originating agency.

 
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